Meet Our Team

It is normal to experience difficult periods in life however if not managed well, these concerns may begin to affect other areas in your life such as family, friends, health, finances and relationships. When things we value most are threatened we can start feeling worthless, hopeless, irritable, worried, frustrated, angry, out of control or isolated. While family and friends may do their best to provide comfort, Mindfully Well will provide you with the opportunity to sit down (one-on-one) with an experienced psychologist and begin to professionally manage and work through your concerns.

At Mindfully Well our psychologists are committed to assisting you to resolve the issues that are holding you back from fully engaging in life.  Our psychologists provide a space for you to voice your concerns and begin taking steps to manage or resolve your difficulties.

It is not uncommon to feel lost and isolated through difficult times.  You are not alone in your battle as everyone will at some stage face particularly demanding challenges.

Kerry Howard - Principal Psychologist - BSc Psych (Honours), EMDR Consultant, MAAPi.

Kerry Howard is a registered psychologist who is skilled in working with people experiencing a wide range of emotional, personal and relationship difficulties with a particular specialty in trauma. She has experience working in both the public and private mental health sectors and received her training at the Australian National University.

Kerry has been working in a range of psychological settings for the past six years, including with headspace and as a School Psychologist. She has extensive experience during that time working with adolescents and adults.

Kerry has a specialty in EMDR Therapy – she is an EMDR Consultant and former Director/Secretary of the Board of the EMDR Association of Australia. Kerry has experience working with both adolescents and adults in addiction treatment, with a specialised focus on food and weight management.

Kerry’s primary modality is EMDR Therapy and has used it extensively with adolescent and adult clients who present with depression, anxiety and trauma as well as treating more complex trauma presenting as PTSD.

Kerry was interviewed in 2015 for her insight and approach to treatment of PTSD, specifically as it relates to Defence Members, for an important Parliamentary Library Monograph on 'Changing Attitudes to Mental Illness in the Australian Defence Force: a long way to go...' written by Dr Edward Scarr.

Kerry also works with a variety of other therapeutic models in addition to EMDR Therapy including Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), Interpersonal Therapy, Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), Mindfulness, Image Relationship Therapy and Resource State Therapy.

Julia Cull - Senior Psychologist - B.A Psych, G Diploma Behavioural Studies, Health Care Psychology, EMDR Therapist (ONLINE ONLY)

Once described by a client as “Formal, Professional, and Good Fun” Julia is not your normal run of the mill psychologist.

There are many reasons for this. Following secondary school Julia did not go straight to university to study psychology. In fact, she had never heard of such a subject, let alone such a profession. Back in her day where she grew up there were limited opportunities for female school leavers. For example, there was teaching, typing (Yes you read that right, there used to be a career path for typists.) and nursing. Julia chose nursing, but not the general kind. She had always had a curiosity for how people’s minds work. Sparked from a year 11 assignment where she had to ask 5 people 3 questions to which she knew the answer (or thought she knew) she was astounded to learn 15 different answers!

Another curiosity that captured her was how was it that a perfectly normal person who functioned well in life could have this all turned around and end up in a psych ward. This is what she was working with in the 1980s in her psychiatric nurse training (now called mental health nurse) at both Aradale Mental Hospital in Ararat Victoria and Larundel Psychiatric Hospital, Bundoora. Both hospitals have since closed down.

Believing that prevention is better than cure and wondering if she could help people better if she caught them earlier, she re trained in counselling and community development work at University (now RMIT) in a course called Welfare Studies. It was during that course that she discovered the subject matter, psychology. So, following completion of her Welfare Qualification in 1986 Julia enrolled in the psychology undergraduate course at Swinburne University, Hawthorne, with a double major of psychology and sociology. The welfare qualification enabled her to work as a counsellor where she gained real life counselling experience whilst learning the academic work alongside it. Her post graduate study was in Behavioural Studies in Health Care Psychology at La Trobe University Bundoora Vic. Her published thesis was “Psychological Variables Associated with Spinal Disability.” Julia has been working as a psychologist since 1995 by which time she was well in her 30s.

Following the formal qualifications required to be a registered psychologist Julia has undertaken further studies in psychotherapy, trauma and couples’ therapy at the Cairnmillar Institute, Camberwell; relationships counselling at Relationships Australia; Hypnosis with many organisations; EMDR and Neuro Feedback.

So why is Julia not your normal run of the mill psychologist? Probably because she didn’t take a direct path to university and by the time she finished her qualification she had already had a lot of life experience. Additionally, Julia has been working with all sorts of people since 1980 (almost 40 years). There is not much that will phase her, or that she hasn’t heard. And as she learned in year 11, not everyone thinks the same way, so she has learned a number of different therapies for helping people. She still believes prevention is better than cure or at least early intervention is key. She is a big fan of breaking down the barriers and seeing a psychologist sooner rather than later. After all, there is nothing to fear – it’s just another, maybe different, set of skills.